Pioneers of Queer Cinema

Pioneers of Queer Cinema

Showtimes

GFFlogo2014

Co-presented by the Portland German Film Festival, this Virtual Screening begins Friday, June 12th and runs through June 30th.

New Restorations of three "Way Ahead of Their Times" Classics, PIONEERS OF QUEER CINEMA!

SPECIAL REPERTORY TICKET PRICE: $15 FOR ALL 3 FILMS!! Separately, tickets are $7 each.

BUY A TICKET, WATCH FROM HOME, SUPPORT THE CLINTON!

Mädchen in Uniform movie poster
Mädchen in Uniform
Director: 
Leontine Sagan, Carl Froelich
Country: 
Germany
Year: 
1931
Runtime: 
88 minutes

As a new student at an all-girls boarding school, Manuela falls in love with the compassionate teacher Fräulein von Bernburg, and her feelings are requited. Experiencing her first love, lonely Manuela also discovers the complexities that come with an illicit romance. This artfully composed landmark of lesbian cinema – and an important anti-fascist film – was the first of just three films directed by Leontine Sagan.

"Beautifully crafted and performed, evocatively lit, and sensitively directed. A landmark film in the evolution of Queer cinema."

- Jason Wood, BBC
 

"A moving portrait of burgeoning sapphic desire, rendered with great technical skill."

- Film at Lincoln Center
 

"One of the few genuine women's films of the 30s."

- Don Druker, Chicago Reader

michael movie poster
Michael
Director: 
Carl Theodor Dreyer
Country: 
Germany
Year: 
1924
Runtime: 
93 minutes

Based on Herman Bang’s 1902 novel of the same name, Dreyer’s film is a fascinating fin-de-siècle study of a “decadent” elderly artist (Benjamin Christensen) driven to despair by his relationship with his young protégé and former model, Michael (Walter Slezak). With suffocatingly sumptuous production design by renowned architect Hugo Häring (his only film work), this Kammerspiel, or “intimate theatre”, foreshadows Dreyer’s magnificent final film Gertrud, by forty years with its “Now I may die content, for I have seen great love” epigraph.

Michael was scripted by Dreyer with Fritz Lang’s wife, Thea von Harbou (Metropolis, M, etc). It stars the director Benjamin Christensen (Häxan); Walter Slezak (Hitchcock’s Lifeboat); Nora Gregor (Renoir’s The Rules of the Game); Mady Christians (Ophüls’ Letter from an Unknown Woman); and Karl Freund (who also shot Metropolis) in his only ever appearance as an actor. Freund lensed most of Michael too, but left to work on Murnau’s The Last Laugh, and Rudolph Maté took over.

"Michael is perhaps Dreyer's first masterpiece, assured, reticent, and radiant."

- Tom Milne, The Films of Carl Dreyer

"The picture speaks through its sumptuous decor, its subtle performances, and, perhaps most crucially, its compositions, expertly lensed by the influential cinematographer Karl Freund."

- Film at Lincoln Center



"Closeups of burning intensity and opulent tableaux of frozen horror suggest the great director's transcendent theme, of divine grace granted and withheld."

- Richard Brody, The New Yorker
 

"Offers a remarkably sympathetic view of gay and bisexual life."

- Tim Purrel, Entertainment Weekly

victor and victoria movie poster
Victor and Victoria
Director: 
Reinhold Schünzel
Country: 
Germany
Year: 
1935
Runtime: 
100 minutes

In this dazzling musical romance, a young woman (Renate Müller), unable to find work as a music hall singer, partners with a down-and-out thespian (Hermann Thimig) to revamp her act. Pretending to be a man performing in drag, Victoria becomes the toast of the international stage. But she soon finds that her playful bending of genders enmeshes her personal and professional life in a tangle of unexpected complications.

Produced in the final days of the Weimar Republic, Victor and Victoria received limited exposure in the United States, and is today best known by Blake Edwards’s 1982 remake and the 1995 Broadway production. Viewers will be delighted to discover that the original is every bit as charming and outrageous, reminiscent of the sly sex comedies of Ernst Lubitsch and Billy Wilder.

"An impressive blast of Weimar decadence...As the inevitable romantic complications ensue, what emerges is a movie with surprisingly tangled gender politics and a melancholy sense of romance, crossed with lively, creative musical numbers."

- Bilge Ebiri, Vulture New York

"Stands as a remarkable example of late Weimar popular cinema and easily takes its place alongside contemporary Hollywood work by Ernst Lubitsch."

- Rick Thompson, Senses of Cinema