Clinton St. Theater presents ORIGINAL CAST ALBUM: “COMPANY”

sounds

 

Sometimes movies are about music and musicians, be they documentary or features. Sometimes it's a movie's soundtrack that stays with you long after the story line and characters have faded.

On Music Sundays, we're bringing some of the most interesting music movies over the last one hundred plus years of filmmaking and from all corners of the globe.

Coming up:

March 6 -- JUBILEE (United Kingdom, 1978)

March 13 -- SMITHEREENS (USA, 1982)

March 20 -- ORIGINAL CAST ALBUM: "COMPANY" (USA, 1970)

March 27 -- HYPE! (USA, 1976)

Clinton St. Theater presents ORIGINAL CAST ALBUM: “COMPANY”

Showtimes

ORIGINAL CAST ALBUM- “COMPANY” screen shot

Its enduring delights are crowned by the singular artistry of Elaine Stritch.

Richard Brody, New Yorker

 

Sondheim comes off as the kindest, gentlest genius you can imagine...

Josh Larsen, LarsenOnFilm

 

D.A. Pennebaker's must-watch documentary, Original Cast Album: Company (1970), brings some of the magic and madness of live theater into your home. ... this legendary documentary is a vital portrait of the dramatic art form.

Katie Duggan, Film Daze

ORIGINAL CAST ALBUM- “COMPANY” movie poster
ORIGINAL CAST ALBUM: “COMPANY”
Director: 
D. A. Pennebaker
Country: 
United States
Year: 
1970
Runtime: 
53 minutes

This holy grail for both documentary and theater aficionados offers a tantalizingly rare glimpse behind the Broadway curtain. In 1970, right after the triumphant premiere of Stephen Sondheim’s groundbreaking concept musical Company, the renowned composer and lyricist, his director Harold Prince, the show’s stars, and a large pit orchestra all went into a Manhattan recording studio as part of a time-honored Broadway tradition: the making of the original cast album. What ensued was a marathon session in which, with the pressures of posterity and the coolly exacting Sondheim’s perfectionism hanging over them, all involved pushed themselves to the limit—including theater legend Elaine Stritch, who fought anxiety and exhaustion to record her iconic rendition of “The Ladies Who Lunch.”

With thrilling immediacy, legendary filmmaker D. A. Pennebaker offers an up-close view of the larger-than-life personalities, frayed-nerve energy, and explosive creative intensity that go into capturing the magic of live performance.

Special Admission

$5 suggested; ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE (includes a $1 service fee).