Today at The Clinton: Tuesday, Oct 19

Clinton St. Theater presents IKIRU

akira_kurosawa

 

Saturday, November 6 - Saturday, November 20, 2021

Films include: STRAY DOG (1949), RASHOMON (1950), IKIRU (1952), SEVEN SAMURAI (1954), THRONE OF BLOOD (1957), THE HIDDEN FORTRESS (1958), RAN (1985)

Akira Kurosawa is unquestionably the best known Japanese filmmaker in the West. This can perhaps be best explained by the fact that he is not so much a Japanese or a Western filmmaker, but that he is a "modern" filmmaker. Like postwar Japan itself, he combines the ancient traditions with a distinctly modern, Western twist.

PURCHASE A $50 PASS FOR ALL SEVEN MOVIES!!!

Clinton St. Theater presents IKIRU

Showtimes

Thursday, Nov 11
7:00pm
ikuru still

A thoughtful, existential meditation about the meaning of life and what constitutes a life well-lived, Ikiru is almost guaranteed to prod the viewer to examine his or her own mortality and ponder how, in the end, the scales will tip.

James Berardinelli, ReelViews

Kurosawa achieves the piercing emotion and poetry of the Italian neorealists, but by opposite means: he doesn't make the camera disappear; instead... he deploys his camera so sharply and unerringly that it seems to take X-rays of the spirit.

Richard Brody, New Yorker

Moving without being sentimental, Kurosawa reaches the sort of emotional depths akin to early Frank Capra films, where cynicism was pushed aside by the integrity of the human spirit.

Nicholas Bell, IONCINEMA.com

ikiru movie poster
IKIRU
Director: 
Akira Kurosawa
Country: 
Japan
Year: 
1952
Runtime: 
143 minutes

Mr. Watanabe suddenly finds that he has terminal cancer. He vows to make his final days meaningful. His attempts to communicate his anguish to his son and daughter-in-law lead only to heartbreak. Finally, inspired by an unselfish co-worker, he turns his efforts to bringing happiness to others by building a playground in a dreary slum neighborhood. When the park is finally completed, he is able to face death with peaceful acceptance.

Special Admission

$10; includes a $2 service fee

Available in advance or at the door.