Today at The Clinton: Thursday, Sep 21

I'm Proud to Be an American

there it was--on that Philadelphia stage--the first black president, the future first woman president; America continues to move one step forward two steps back in the right direction.

I'm a political junkie. I LOVE political conventions, and I've been glued to CSPAN every night for the past week. (I could only stomach so much of the shenanigans in Cleveland, so my viewing time that week was more moderate.)  

My first election was in 1968 between Hubert Humphrey and Richard Nixon. I was only in 8th grade, but somehow I knew that Democrats would make things better. Needless to say, I did not convince my Democrat-in-Name-Only, right-wing, Oklahoman father to vote for Humphrey; and Nixon, like every other Republic since that time, took that state in record numbers. Four years later, I was part of the first group of 18-year olds to vote, and although my candidate, George McGovern, didn't stand a chance, I stood in line for close to six hours to cast my ballot for him.

Like Hillary, I'm a second wave feminist, but she was not my first choice in this election cycle. However, I didn't realized how much it meant for me to have a woman at the head of the ticket until I saw her walk on stage Wednesday night to embrace Barack Obama. In my own lifetime, I've been fired for telling a 16-year old female fast food worker that she didn't have to accept the advances of an older married manager; I was told that I couldn't exude authority from a pulpit because I sounded like a 12-year old; I've been told that I couldn't possibly do a job because I had children in high school; and after running a business with Roger with 3 million in annual sales and more than 50 employees, when we sold the company, it was assumed by the new owners that I was only there because I was the "wifey."

barack and hillaryBut there it was--on that Philadelphia stage--the first black president, the future first woman president; American continues to move one step forward two steps back in the right direction.

I posture that we won't be able to say that if the other side wins and we take hundreds of steps back into the last century. Unless, of course, it is a truly dystopian future, and like some sci-fi horror film we are all enslaved by either robots or high-functioning primates. According to Bill O'Reilly that wouldn't be so bad as we would have decent food and a roof over our heads. Maybe that's the Republicans plan to end poverty and homelessness.