Cult Classic Fridays

monkey faces

 

Weird, unconventional or truly transgressive, Cult Films push boundaries of decency and sometimes break cultural taboos. They can be soooooooo bad that they're good, and f*cking fun to watch, especially when you're throwing back a cold one with friends.

Join our Cult, most Friday nights at 10pm. 

 

Showtimes

Friday, Jul 30
10:00pm
element of crime screen shot

an utterly mesmerizing and completely disjointed crime thriller that is more about tone and style than it is about its fragmented narrative

James Kendrick, Q Network Film Desk

The first great film to combine a sepia tone with film-noir shadows in order to conceive Europe as a post-apocalyptic barren land on the verge of complete anarchic disorder. Trier uses the archetypical detective with confronted emotions and priorities to highlight his vicious-circle story. Very underrated twist on the genres it treats, including the first use of the director's trademark: hypnosis. 97/100

Edgar C, Rotten Tomatoes Super Reviewer

Media: 
the element of crime poster
THE ELEMENT OF CRIME
Director: 
Lars von Trier
Country: 
Denmark
Year: 
1984
Runtime: 
104 minutes

Fisher (Michael Elphick), an ex-detective, decides to take one final case when a mysterious serial killer claims the lives of several young girls. Fisher, unable to find the culprit, turns to Osbourne (Esmond Knight), a writer who was once respected for his contributions to the field of criminology. Fisher begins to use Osbourne's technique, which involves empathizing with serial killers; however, as the detective becomes increasingly engrossed in this method, things take a disturbing turn.

Showtimes

Friday, Aug 6
10:00pm
FANTASTIC PLANET

 

This is a beautiful work of art which combines serious sci-fi with fanciful designs, a distinct style and a big message. A classic which is very highly recommended.

Ard Vijn, ScreenAnarchy

It's not every fancifully encoded cautionary tale that can survive the demise of its historical villains, and it's not every stoner midnight movie that can stand a second viewing in the sober light of day.

Gary Dauphin, Village Voice

Media: 
fantastic planet movie poster
FANTASTIC PLANET
Director: 
René Laloux
Country: 
France, Czechoslovakia
Year: 
1973
Runtime: 
72 minutes

This animated tale follows the relationship between the small human-like Oms and their much larger blue-skinned oppressors, the Draags, who rule the planet of Ygam. While the Draags have long kept Oms as illiterate pets, this hierarchy shifts after an Om boy becomes educated, thanks to a young female Draag. This leads to an Om rebellion, which weakens the Draag control over their race. Will the Oms and the Draags find a way to coexist? Or will they destroy each other?

Special Admission

$6; ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE (includes a $1 service fee).

Showtimes

Friday, Aug 13
10:00pm
holy mountain screen shot

Not even Buuel with a brainful of Woodstock's bad brown acid could have made something this gloriously screwy.

David Fear, Time Out

Alejandro Jodorowsky's Holy Mountain is a dazzling, rambling, often incoherent satire on consumerism, militarism and exploitation.

Matt Zoller Seitz, New York Times

This is an extraordinary visual concoction, loaded with stunning primary colors, anti-religious caricatures drawn from Diego Rivera and a succession of dreamlike, grotesque vistas worthy of Dal at his most deranged.

Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.com

Media: 
the-holy-mountain-vintage-movie-poster
THE HOLY MOUNTAIN
Director: 
Alejandro Jodorowsky
Country: 
Mexico
Year: 
1975
Runtime: 
114 minutes

In a corrupt, greed-fueled world, a powerful alchemist leads a messianic character and seven materialistic figures to the Holy Mountain, where they hope to achieve enlightenment.

Special Admission

$6; ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE (includes a $1 service fee).

Double feature with EL TOPO $12 (includes a $2 service fee).

 

Showtimes

Friday, Aug 20
10:00pm
irma-vep-maggie-cheung

Irma Vep is a magnificently varied film, integrating film footage, press interviews, gossip, and film's hurry-up-and-wait production schedule. Cheung in particular does a masterful job playing herself, at once transparent and opaque.

Alyx Vesey, Bitch Media

An exhilarating film that happens to be about moviemaking itself, Olivier Assayas's sinuous, kinetic, waggish Irma Vep is an oblique, supremely enjoyable course in movie history.

Melissa Anderson, 4Columns

Though Irma Vep may be best appreciated by movieheads, it's hardly just an homage. By its shrieking avant-garde climax, it's more like a statement on how history, even filmed history, can fragment and dissolve into oblivion.

Michael Atkinson, Spin

Media: 
irma-vep-movie poster
IRMA VEP
Director: 
Olivier Assayas
Country: 
France
Year: 
1997
Runtime: 
99 minutes

Washed-up French director René Vidal (Jean-Pierre Léaud) hopes to turn his career around with an update of "Les Vampires," a silent-era masterpiece about about a notorious ring of thieves, led by crafty female crook Irma Vep. René brings in Chinese star Maggie Cheung (Maggie Cheung) to play Vep, but unexpected roadblocks arise on the set. Maggie doesn't know French, she's pursued by obsessive lesbian crew member Zoe (Nathalie Richard) and her character's criminal ways begin to rub off on her.

Special Admission

$6; includes a $1 service.

ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE.