Today at The Clinton: Tuesday, Jan 18

Clinton Cult Classics

monkey faces

 

Weird, unconventional or truly transgressive, Cult Films push boundaries of decency and sometimes break cultural taboos. They can be soooooooo bad that they're good, and f*cking fun to watch, especially when you're throwing back a cold one with friends.

Join our Cult, most Friday nights at 10pm. 

 

Showtimes

Friday, Jan 21
10:00pm
border radio still

Border Radio," though nearly 25-years old, is surprisingly fresh, still. The music, by notable LA punkers of the time, is done with talent and energy and lends to the hip quotient of the film.

Robin Clifford, Reeling Reviews

Media: 
border-radio-movie-poster
BORDER RADIO
Director: 
Allison Anders, Dean Lent, Kurt Voss
Country: 
United States
Year: 
1987
Runtime: 
87 minutes

Before carving out a niche as one of the most distinct voices in nineties American cinema, Allison Anders made her debut, alongside codirectors and fellow UCLA film school students Kurt Voss and Dean Lent, with 1987’s Border Radio.

A low-key, semi-improvised postpunk diary that took four years to complete, Border Radio features legendary rocker Chris D., of the Flesh Eaters, as a singer/songwriter who has stolen loot from a club and gone missing, leaving his wife (Luanna Anders), a no-nonsense rock journalist, to track him down with the help of his friends (John Doe of the band X; Chris Shearer).

With its sprawling Southern Californian and Mexican landscapes, captured in evocative 16mm black and white, Border Radio is a singular, DIY memento of the indie film explosion in America.

Special Admission

$6 (includes a $1 service fee).

ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE.

Showtimes

Friday, Jan 28
10:00pm
the vanishing 1988 still

Kubrick considered Sluizer's The Vanishing a truly terrifying film, and its power is in its unsettling simplicity as it explores the potency of its nightmare scenarios.

Nicholas Bell, IONCINEMA.com

 

The appalling, horrific climax of The Vanishing will haunt your mind long after this film is over.

Michael Wilmington, Los Angeles Times

 

..a wonderful thriller which deserves to find a new audience..

Rob Aldam, Backseat Mafia

Media: 
the vanishing 1988 movie poster
THE VANISHING
Director: 
George Sluizer
Country: 
Netherlands
Year: 
1988
Runtime: 
107 minutes

A young man embarks on an obsessive search for the girlfriend who mysteriously disappeared while the couple were taking a sunny vacation trip, and his three-year investigation draws the attention of her abductor, a mild-mannered professor with a clinically diabolical mind.

An unorthodox love story and a truly unsettling thriller, Dutch filmmaker George Sluizer’s The Vanishing unfolds with meticulous intensity, leading to an unforgettable finale that has unnerved audiences around the world.

Special Admission

$5-8 suggested; no one turned away for lack of funds.

$6 ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE. (includes a $1 service fee)

Showtimes

Friday, Feb 4
10:00pm
the lure photo still

It's got teen romance, misandry, cannibalism, and synchronized dancing - what's not to love?

Dahlia Balcazar, Bitch Media

 

The Lure is remarkable not just for its zaniness but for its willingness to let girls be girls. It's not a luxury often afforded to female characters, especially not in horror, and it's especially notable as the male characters are either food or flakes.

Karen Han, CutPrintFilm

 

The concept is delightful, and the realization a first-rate labor of love, talent, and artistic skill, untrammelled by big budget.

Erin Blackwell, Bay Area Reporter

Media: 
the lure movie poster
THE LURE
Director: 
Agnieszka Smoczyńska
Country: 
Poland
Year: 
2015
Runtime: 
92 minutes

In this bold, genre-defying horror-musical mashup — the playful and confident debut of Polish director Agnieszka Smoczynska — a pair of carnivorous mermaid sisters are drawn ashore in an alternate '80s Poland to explore the wonders and temptations of life on land. Their tantalizing siren songs and otherworldly aura make them overnight sensations as nightclub singers in the half-glam, half-decrepit fantasy world of Smoczynska's imagining.

In a visceral twist on Hans Christian Andersen's original Little Mermaid tale, one sister falls for a human, and as the bonds of sisterhood are tested, the lines between love and survival get blurred.

A savage coming-of-age fairytale with a catchy new-wave soundtrack, lavishly grimy sets, and outrageous musical numbers, The Lure explores its themes of sexuality, exploitation, and the compromises of adulthood with energy and originality.

Special Admission

$5-8 suggested; no one turned away for lack of funds.

$6 TICKET AVAILABLE IN ADVANCE (includes a $1 service fee).

Showtimes

Friday, Feb 11
10:00pm
sweet sweetback film still

Like a Bertolt Brecht play or a George Grosz drawing, [Sweetback] lets you know where it's at as far as the creator is concerned. As an expression of Van Peeble's attitudes it is a stunning, albeit shattering experience.

J. Oliver Prescott, Tampa Bay Times

 

That a film released in 1971 remains accurate in its portrayal of the way the black community is persecuted by police in America in 2018 gives the film an added emotional heft.

Lee Jutton, Film Inquiry

 

[It] brazenly kicked the door open for everything from direct imitators like Shaft, Superfly, and Dolemite to modern filmmakers like Tyler Perry and Ice Cube.

Chuck Foster, Film Threat

Media: 
SWEET SWEETBACK’S BAADASSSSS SONG movie poster
SWEET SWEETBACK’S BAADASSSSS SONG
Director: 
Melvin Van Peebles
Country: 
United States
Year: 
1971
Runtime: 
97 minutes

A landmark of Black and American independent cinema that would send shock waves through the culture, Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song was Melvin Van Peebles’s second feature film, after he walked away from a contract with Columbia in order to make his next film on his own terms.

Acting as producer, director, writer, composer, editor, and star, Van Peebles created the prototype for what Hollywood would eventually co-opt and make into the blaxploitation hero: a taciturn, perpetually blank-faced performer in a sex show, who, when he’s pushed too far by a pair of racist cops looking to frame him for a crime he didn’t commit, goes on the run through a lawless underground of bikers, revolutionaries, sex workers, and hippies in a kill-or-be-killed quest for liberation from white oppression. 

Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song’s incendiary politics are matched by Van Peebles’s revolutionary style, in which jagged jump cuts, kaleidoscopic superimpositions, and psychedelic sound design come together in a sustained howl of rage and defiance.

Special Admission

$5-8 suggested; no one turned away for lack of funds.

$6 TICKET AVAILABLE IN ADVANCE (includes a $1 service fee).

Showtimes

Friday, Feb 18
10:00pm
chungking express still photo

Chungking Express is a breezy little Hong Kong movie that has more life, energy, humanity and sheer visual zing than most other shows you'll see in a month or so.

Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune

 

It's the cinematic equivalent of popcorn on a hot stove with jump-cut shots, freeze frames, stirringly beautiful images and boundless energy.

Desson Thomson, Washington Post

 

The masterful Wong Kar-wai crafts this exquisitely shot film - two films in one, really - into a meditation on love. Along the way, he uses music as only he can...

Kanishk Devgan, Film Companion

Media: 
CHUNGKING EXPRESS movie poster
CHUNGKING EXPRESS
Director: 
Wong Kar Wai
Country: 
Hong Kong
Year: 
1994
Runtime: 
102 minutes

The whiplash, double-pronged "Chungking Express" is one of the defining works of nineties cinema and the film that made Hong Kong filmmaker Wong Kar Wai an instant icon.

Two heartsick Hong Kong cops (Takeshi Kaneshiro and Tony Leung), both jilted by ex-lovers, cross paths at the Midnight Express take-out restaurant stand, where the ethereal pixie waitress Faye (Faye Wong) works.

Anything goes in Wong’s gloriously shot and utterly unexpected charmer, which cemented the sex appeal of its gorgeous stars and forever turned canned pineapple and the Mamas and the Papas’ “California Dreamin’” into tokens of romantic longing.

Special Admission

$5-8 suggested; no one turned away for lack of funds.

$6 TICKET AVAILABLE IN ADVANCE (includes a $1 service fee).

Showtimes

Friday, Feb 25
10:00pm
body snatcher from hell film stills

Just as brilliant, beautiful, and entertaining as Romero's first zombie masterpiece.

Rob Humanick, Projection Booth

 

An astonishment from start to finish, from its vivid opening shot of a passenger plane in an obviously artificial sky that resembles a 'sea of blood' to the complementary final image of an invading armada of flying saucers.

John Beifuss, Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)

 

Iron-clad-nutso proof that a film can be simultaneously ridiculous and smart, and should not be confused for disposable camp.

Christopher Long, Movie Metropolis

Media: 
GOKE, BODY SNATCHER FROM HELL movie poster
GOKE, BODY SNATCHER FROM HELL
Director: 
Hajime Sato
Country: 
Japan
Year: 
1968
Runtime: 
84 minutes

After an airplane is forced to crash-land in a remote area, its passengers find themselves face-to-face with an alien force that wants to possess them body and soul—and perhaps take over the entire human race.

Filled with creatively repulsive effects—including a very invasive bloblike life-form—Hajime Sato’s Goke, Body Snatcher from Hell is a pulpy, apocalyptic gross-out.

Special Admission

$5-8 suggested; no one turned away for lack of funds.

$6 TICKET AVAILABLE IN ADVANCE (includes a $1 service fee).